Wausau, Wisconsin

Lori Schubring

We’re passionate about birds and nature. That’s why we opened a Wild Birds Unlimited Nature Shop in our community.

Wausau, Wisconsin

4121 Rib Mountain Dr
Wausau, WI 54401

Phone: (715) 298-3140
Email: Send Message

Store Hours:
Mon - Fri: 10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Sat: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sun: 11:00 am - 5:00 pm

Additional Website:
Visit our other website

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Wild Birds Unlimited - Wausau

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Do you have a question about birds, bird feeding or about the store? If your question isn't answered here, please e-mail us at wbuwausau@gmail.com 

 

Q: I found a baby bird on the ground. What should I do? I don’t want it to die.

A: If the bird is NOT injured:

  1. Be certain the area is free of any animal that can cause harm. Especially keep cats and dogs away from the nest site.
  2. If you find a bird on the ground, carefully return it to the nest. IT is a myth that the parents won't care for a baby once it is touched by humans.
  3. If the original nest is unsafe or destroyed, place the bird in a small basket. Nail the basket to the tree near the nest site, out of the direct sunlight. If you cant find a basket, use a margrine dish, but be sure to punch drainage holes in the bottom to prevent drowning.
  4. It is a good idea to keep an eye on the baby bird from a discreet distance. If the parents do not return in an hour, call your local DNR or wildlife rehabilitation center for help. (See contact list below)

A: If the bird IS injured:

  1. Prepare a small cardboard box by punching ventilation holes in the sides and the top.
  2. Gently, place the bird on the towel and the box in a warm, dry, quiet area.
  3. DO NOT GIVE THE BIRD ANY FOOD OR WATER!
  4. Call your nearest DNR office or wildlife rehabilitation center.

Wildlife Rehabilitation Centers Antigo, Raptor Education Group, Inc.: 715-623-4015
Arbor Vitae, Feathered Friends: 715-356-5490
Minocqua, Northwoods Wildlife Center: 715-356-7400
New London, Wind River Wildlife Rehab: 920-982-6825

Q: Is it OK to keep feeding birds in the spring and summer?

A: Yes, it is. Some people prefer not to feed birds in the spring and summer when there is abundant food. However, during migration in the spring, a bird feeder might be a very welcome source of food for a bird that has already come a long way from its wintering grounds and still has a long way to go before reaching its breeding grounds. In the summer, even though there is a lot of food available for birds, their energy requirements are high because they must feed their young.

To ensure a safe bird-feeding environment, change hummingbird nectar every three days. Dispose of wet or moldy birdseed. Change water in birdbaths daily. Remove suet in hot weather because it may spoil quickly and use suet dough instead. 

 

 

Q: I discovered a bird was sitting on a nest in a shrub next to our house. We’re planning on having the house painted next week. What should I do? Can I move the nest?

A: If it is possible to delay the painting for a month, and you can wait for the young to leave the nest, that would be the best solution for the birds. If that is not possible, then ask the painters to minimize their presence around the nest. Although there is a risk the bird will abandon the nest, many yard birds are tolerant of occasional disturbances. If you move the nest, there is a very good chance that the bird will abandon it.

 

Q: I discovered that a bird built its nest in my boat. I’m going to need that boat in a few weeks. I don’t want to hurt the bird or any babies, but how long before I can use the boat?


A: Because each bird species is a little different, I can’t tell you exactly how long you’ll need to wait. However, I can give you a few guidelines. Birds usually lay one egg a day. They don’t begin incubating their eggs until all the eggs have been laid. Clutch sizes vary from 2 to 8 eggs for most common backyard birds. Once the last egg has been laid, incubation takes about two weeks. The eggs will usually hatch about the same time. From that point, it will take another two weeks before the nestlings are ready to leave the nest. To be on the safe side, and to allow for variety in species, you should probably allow six weeks before planning on using the boat.

 

Q: A bird keeps flying into my window. Why is it doing this? I’m afraid it will hurt itself—what should I do?

A: The behavior you mention often occurs in spring. This is the time of year when most birds are busy establishing their territories, finding a mate, laying eggs, and raising their young. They are very protective of their territory and will attack and try to drive away any bird they view as a possible competitor or a threat to their young. When they see their own reflection in your window, they assume they’re seeing a competitor and so they attack their own image. Both males and females may do this, especially species that often nest close to houses, such as American Robins, Northern Cardinals, Chipping Sparrows, and Song Sparrows.

 

 

This territorial reaction may be so strong that the bird may exhaust itself, but it usually doesn't result in fatal injury. Try covering the outside of the window with netting or fabric so the reflection is no longer visible. You can also try drawing soap streaks across the window to break up the reflection. Another idea is to try using a yellow highlighter to draw streaks across the window (the theory is that birds can see ultra-violet wavelengths in the highlighter that we can't see). You will probably be able to take down the netting and remove the soap several weeks later, when passions aren't running quite so high. The highlighter will need to be re-applied often as it wears out and washes off.

A: Yes, it is. Some people prefer not to feed birds in the spring and summer when there is abundant food. However, during migration in the spring, a bird feeder might be a very welcome source of food for a bird that has already come a long way from its wintering grounds and still has a long way to go before reaching its breeding grounds. In the summer, even though there is a lot of food available for birds, their energy requirements are high because they must feed their young.

 

Q: There's an unusual bird at my feeders. It’s mostly black and white but it has a bright red triangle on its breast. What is it?

A: I always know spring has come when I get this question. It means the Rose-breasted Grosbeak is migrating north.

 

Q: I have a hunch that the bird singing outside my window is the same one who nested here last year. Could that be true?

A: Possibly. Many migratory songbirds return to the same territory or local area each spring after traveling thousands of miles to and from their wintering grounds. Migratory songbirds tend to have short lives (annual mortality rates are about 50 percent), so some of the birds in your yard each year are probably newcomers. Studies of banded birds show that 20-60 percent of migratory songbirds typically return to the same local area.